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Tuesday, December 3 • 3:30pm - 5:30pm
BREAKOUT SESSION ONE: Housing & STS

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Chair: Manuel Vallee

Michael Nuth: Socio-technical networks and housing failure: a sociological explanation of technical flaws within medium-density housing


Orin Lockyer: Consuming Houses: Production and Consumption through the lens of first-time clients building a house in New Zealand


Casimir MacGregor: Beyond behaviour change? The epistemic and social practice foundations for ‘behaviour change’ in the context of the transition to a net- zero carbon economy


Zohreh Karami Nejad: The foundations of collaborative governance: Building the soft infrastructure of 'housing' renewal

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During the last decades, collaborative governance, has been advocated as an approach with many benefits for planning, policy and decision making. While collaborative governance is seen as an improvement on technocractic ‘top-down’ approaches, critics note significant concerns around inclusion, power-imbalance and other inequalities. Also, the main focus of the theory seems to be on a single formal collaboration stage, and it lacks enough attention to pre-history and context of collaborations. We found that an informal, pre-collaboration ‘stage’ was critical in mitigating contextual and historical factors that often lead to marginalisation during more formal negotiations. Before undertaking consensus-oriented deliberations in settings that privilege certain interests, our data emphasised building trust and credibility, collective community capability and a mandate as foundational to the process. We conclude with the idea that we need to extend and expand our conceptualisation of collaborative governance to include a composite of formal and informal elements that provide varied opportunities for inclusion and alternative means of representation.


Each presentation will be allocated 20 minutes. Additional time for questions and discussion will be available in each stream.